Health Risks of Mold Exposure & How to Keep Your Home Mold Free

By:    |   Published January 24, 2019

There are thousands of species of the fungi commonly known as mold. Mold exposure, especially for those with asthma or mold sensitivities, poses a serious risk to your home and family. Everything from yourself, to your pets to even your belongings can be harmed due to mold exposure. So what exactly are the health risks of mold exposure? Let’s look at the impact of mold and how to keep your home mold free. read more

What Is Weeping Tile? Is It Important for My Home?

By:    |   Published January 10, 2019

How your property handles water drainage is one thing you can’t overlook. If you’ve had concerns about waterproofing your home, you may have heard about an option called weeping tile. What is weeping tile? It’s an effective system for capturing and moving water away from your home that goes back centuries! read more

Interior vs Exterior Waterproofing

By:    |   Published December 3, 2018

Whether it’s a damp, musty smell that meets you each time you enter your basement or the pooling water in your back yard whenever it rains, you are considering basement waterproofing for a reason. What are the different waterproofing options and which is better when it comes to interior vs exterior waterproofing? Read on to learn more about these two options of waterproofing and which one, or a combination of the two, is right for your home.

Common Crawl Space Waterproofing Problems & Solutions

By:    |   Published September 5, 2018

Basements have a lot of nooks and crannies, but the biggest space to watch out for is your crawl space. This large, open area is a magnet for moisture and pests due to its size and how infrequently it’s accessed. Many homeowners run into crawl space waterproofing issues because their home wasn’t properly waterproofed in the past.

If you’re tired of mold growth or other moisture-related problems, read on to learn about the most common issues with crawl space waterproofing and how to keep moisture out once and for all.

What is a Michigan Basement & How Do You Protect it from Water?

By:    |   Published April 25, 2018

Whether you live in Michigan, Ohio, or another area, you may have heard the term “Michigan basement.” In this article we’ll explore what that term means and offer tips on how to protect your Michigan basement from water damage!

Waterproofing Window Wells to Protect Your Basement

By:    |   Published March 20, 2018

Keeping water out of your house is a priority for every homeowner. Unlike foundation cracks or other damage, most homeowners aren’t surprised to learn their basement windows are a major risk factor for water intrusion. Waterproofing window wells and the windows inside of them is an important step toward keeping your basement safe from the weather.

Warming Weather Could Put You At Risk for Snowmelt Flooding!

By:    |   Published January 25, 2018

Weather can be unpredictable. One moment it’s snowing, the next it feels like spring. While many long for warmer temperatures throughout the bulk of winter, it’s important to appreciate the risk that rapid rises in temperature can cause to your home. Your joy of the warm, sunny day may evaporate the moment you notice the snowmelt flooding your basement.

Should I Seal the Gap Between My Basement Floor and Wall?

By:    |   Published January 4, 2018

Every homeowner is concerned with keeping their house protected from moisture and water damage. One area that is vulnerable to seepage is your home’s cove joint. Unfortunately, you can’t just seal the gap between your basement floor and wall to fix it. Learn why not, and the best options for keeping water out of the cove joint by reading below.

What Is a Cove Joint?

This joint, where your basement wall and floor meet, is known as a cove joint. It exists due to the way that a home’s foundation is poured. After your foundation footings are built, your basement walls are poured so that they slot into a keyway. This helps keep them properly aligned.

When your walls have cured, the basement floor itself is then poured. This leaves a small gap between the floor and the walls – known as the cove joint.

Why Does the Cove Joint Leak?

Following a heavy rain, ground water around your home will rise. It begins to push into any potential openings in your foundation. Because the cove joint is a necessary part of structuring your foundation, it’s a common entry point for water. As prolonged rains or heavy rains continue, they’ll begin to force their way in through these gaps. This is typically referred to as hydrostatic pressure.

Why You Can’t Just Seal the Gap Between Your Basement Floor and Wall

It may seem like an obvious solution to simply seal the cove joint to prevent water from breaching into your home. However, it’s not that simple. In the short term, a sealant applied along this gap between your basement floor and wall may prevent leakage. However, it will eventually fail in one of two ways:

#1. The water being blocked by the sealant will find another gap in your foundation to enter the home. Typically, this will be cracks in your foundation.

#2. The sealant you used will be forced off or penetrated by the water. Once this happens, all the water will leak through the opening in your sealant, rendering it useless.

Either of these events will happen due to the strength of the hydrostatic pressure. It’s not easy for water to push into your home. When it meets with resistance, such as a sealant, it will work its way through or around that resistance.

The Best Solutions to Protect Your Cove Joint

While sealing the gap isn’t recommended, you do have options to help protect your home from potential water damage. There are

multiple approaches to keep this water from leaking into your basement read more

How to Clean Up & Prevent Damage After a Flood in the Basement

By:    |   Published May 26, 2017

Even the most well-prepared homeowners sometimes can’t prevent environmental disasters from happening. Whether it’s a fierce storm or a burst pipe, flooded basements are a reality that affects hundreds of thousands of homes each year. What can you do to minimize the damage from a flood in the basement? Read our tips on the proper way to handle basement flooding, including recommendations on how to protect yourself before they happen.

Staying Safe:

The most important thing to remember is to never enter a basement that’s flooded if it could have electricity running. Chances are if your basement flooded, you either don’t have a sump pump, or you don’t have a sump pump with an emergency battery backup. If the power went out, you may want to get it restored right away to get your sump pump going again. But any electricity in the water creates a deadly hazard. Make sure to disable ALL of the power to the basement, a socket that’s not being used or loose wires you can’t see can still electrify the water.

Additionally, if your flood was due to backed up sewage, the average homeowner is not equipped to safely clean it up. You will need to contact a professional, as sewage can contain a large volume of contaminants that spread illness or disease.

Steps for Cleaning Up:

#1. Turn Off Water & Power.

If your basement flooding happened due to a leaky or burst pipe, the first step is to turn off the water. This will prevent any further water from filling the space and give you time to contact a plumber. It’s also critical to ensure the power is off for the entire basement. If you’re not completely confident that the water is safe, don’t attempt to enter the basement at all— call a professional.

#2. Remove Everything You Can

When you’re positive there’s no risk of electric shock, you can begin removing items that can be saved. Start by taking out any electronics, both for safety purposes and to potentially salvage them. You will have to remove furniture and anything stored in the area. Depending on the purity of the water, some of it may be reusable once it’s dried. A leaky pipe often just causes water damage, but backed up sewage or a groundwater flood will likely introduce bacteria into anything it touches, requiring you to throw it away or have it professionally cleaned.

#3. Clean Up Excess Water

Once your basement is safe and you have most of your salvageable items removed, you can start to tackle the water that’s remaining. There are a number of ways accomplish this, but they depend on the equipment you have available. The simplest solution is to use towels and buckets, soaking up and dumping the water elsewhere. A shop vac can also help, but make sure not to plug it in anywhere that could put you at risk for electric shock.

#4. Remove Moisture

After your basement has had all of the flooded water removed, you’ll need to dry out the area. Open the windows and use fans to help remove moisture from the environment. If you own a dehumidifier, make sure to turn it on with the windows closed and regularly empty it. Remember when using a dehumidifier to remove contaminated water that the dehumidifier itself will then also be contaminated and should be replaced after you’re finished.

If your basement is carpeted, you will need to remove the carpet. Even if you do everything to dry it out, moisture can stay trapped beneath it and lead to major mold problems. You probably won’t be able to save the carpet, especially if the flood came from an unclean water source.

You will also need to remove drywall and insulation. They can act as sponges for the water, and you’ll need to access the areas behind them to fully dry out the supports and make sure no wiring is still exposed to water. It’s highly recommended to leave these steps to a professional, to ensure the job is done thoroughly and without risking more damage to your home.

#5. Disinfect the Area

Once the basement is dry, you will have to disinfect everything. Even if the flood water was “clean,” moisture can quickly let bacteria and mold begin to thrive in your basement. Any surface that was wet or near the flood will need to be thoroughly disinfected. This may drastically reduce your chance for developing mold or other illnesses in the future.

Protect Yourself Against Water Damage

There’s a lot you can do to avoid water damage. Staying proactive will help reduce your risk of flooding, and save yourself countless hours and potentially hundreds of dollars in damage and expenses from a basement flood.

Keep Your Gutters Maintained

Your

gutters are your home’s first line of defense read more

How to Prevent Allergens and Mold in the Basement

By:    |   Published March 22, 2017

If there was one place in your home that is most likely to cause allergy flare-ups, it’s your basement. Due to the high humidity, basements make excellent hosts for the most common home allergens. It’s surprisingly common to find mold in the basement, making it one of the most likely triggers for allergy symptoms or respiratory issues in a house.

That means you need to allergy proof your basement, and you’ll need to know where to start. EverDry Toledo can help! Read this list to learn the steps you can take to reduce your chances developing mold in the basement.

#1. Use a Dehumidifier

Excessive moisture creates the ideal environment for mold in the basement and dust mites. By reducing the moisture levels, you can make it difficult for them to thrive in your basement. When using your dehumidifier, you’ll want to aim for 35-45% relative humidity. Higher humidity is what promotes molds and dust mites, but if the humidity is too low it can promote viruses.

#2. Improve Ventiliation with the E-Z Breathe System

The E-Z- Breathe System can improve your air quality with no regular maintenance required.  Once installed, this unit protects your home from poor air quality, as well as molds, toxins, and allergies. Learn more about improving your home’s atmosphere with the E-Z- Breathe System.

#3. Immediately Remove Mold in the Basement

This may seem obvious, but even the tiniest bit of mold needs to be removed as soon as possible. Never let the problem get out of hand and you can save yourself a lot of trouble down the road.

While some people believe musty smells are typical for basements, they’re not – they’re only a strong indicator of mold or mildew. Just because you can’t see it, doesn’t mean it’s not there! The moment you think you notice the smell of mildew or mold in the basement, identify the source and remove it.

#4. Replace Carpeting

Wall-to-wall carpeting may look nice in your basement, but it can absorb a lot of moisture over time. To prevent allergens, consider basement floor options like cement, slate, or linoleum. There are plenty of ways to keep your floor looking great without the need for carpet – and almost any other option reduces your risk of promoting mold in the basement.

#5. Fix Plumbing Leaks as Soon as Possible

Small leaks can be dealt with on your own with the right DIY knowledge, but sometimes the small problems are indicators of a bigger issue. It’s always best to call a professional to safely deal with any plumbing issues before they become disasters. Take every leak or break seriously, as water can quickly cause damage that requires costly repairs.

#6. Fix Cracks in the Foundation Immediately

It’s critical that you keep the foundation secure. A small crack inside of the foundation often means more cracks on the outside – and these all lead to water seepage that can not only foster basement allergens, but also cause severe damage to your home or property. If you notice cracks, contact us and we may be able to help prevent further leaks with

foundation crack injections read more